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In celebration of Women's History Month...

Black
                                    Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors
Black Stars: African American Women Scientists and Inventors

Sullivan once headed Detroit's program to infuse African American history into the public school curriculum. Here he profiles 25 black American woman who have made significant contributions to science and technology, explaining that many, many more are utterly unknown because first of legal bans on granting patents to slaves and later because of social constraints on women. His message to black school girls is that just because they have not heard of black women scientists does not mean that the profession is closed to them. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Life
                                    Lessons for My Black Girls
Life Lessons for My Black Girls

Author and motivational speaker, Natasha Munson realized that there are many things we learn in life as individuals yet we never fully pass that knowledge on to our children. "We need to be an example to our children. We need to honestly tell them about our experiences and the things we have learned in life. Our goal should not be to hide reality from our children but to empower them with the knowledge we possess. I believe we are all responsible for empowering ourselves and our children by learning the lessons brought by our experiences."

Daughters
                                    of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman's Film
Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman's Film

In the winter of 1992, nearly one hundred years after motion pictures were invented, the first nationally distributed feature by an African American woman was released in the United States. Daughters of the Dust, written and directed by Julie Dash, was not only praised by critics but became a word-of-mouth sensation, selling out shows week after week. The New York Times called it a "film of spell-binding visual beauty," and said that Dash "emerges as a strikingly original film maker." Featuring Dash's story and production notes in her own words, this compelling chronicle of her struggle to complete Daughters of the Dust is a book that every film buff and student of the art will want to own. Read the book, then rent the movie!